..and now for something completely different, a new debut album has just come onto the electronic scene from the Australian Kbit, aka Kosta Andreadis.  Why is Un Boombox Symphonique so different?  In an era where EDM threatens to supplant Rave, there are certain champions of chill house and experimental electronic who are still willing to be true to those forms.  Kbit is also thoroughly modern with his debut release, however, and the album has already received a number of positive reviews.

There is a strong feeling of Switched-On Bach to this album, and the cover art gives the audience a preview of that possibility before it even begins to listen, as it’s clearly a nod to images from 2001: A Space Odyssey.  Much of the album contains symphonic string melodies (see “Anytime but Then), and though it’s clear that Anreadis uses only the most modenr programming software, there is still a very analog composition style which hearkens back to the days of true experimentation with Moogs, tube amplifiers, and the like.  

Layered on top of its classic and classical base, Un Boombox Symphonique also pulls from the beginnings of downtempo and chill house in the late 80s and early 90s, and there’s a definite vein of Daft Punk running throughout the EP, as well as Herbie Hancock-esque rhythm samplings.

The modern appeal to this EP will be from the ambient and peaceful composition of these tracks, along the lines of M83 or Slack Armada, but Un Boombox Symphonique does something that these more modern acts don’t; re-introduces chill house as almost a forgotten genre.  Very little re-vamping here, Kbit sticks to the simple elegance of a good chill rave track, and it works.  Both GenX and younger audiences will appreciate this EP.

The widget above streams the full EP, and listeners may also download some of Kbit’s previous work on his SoundCloud page.  For listeners who wish to download the album or its tracks, it’s available on Kbit’s Bandcamp page.


Written by Layla Marino